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Bathroom Designs for Small Spaces

December 16, 2012 in Cloakroom Suites

Small on space but big on style

A small bathroom can be a design challenge. Trying to fit everything in can seem like a daunting task.However, with bathroom collections designed for small spaces and a bit of creativity, it’s possible to get a bathroom to have all the amenities without feeling cramped.
Small designs 
A great help in coming up with bathroom designs for small spaces is specially made bathroom units.While normal units can often work in small spaces, there are a number of bathroom
suites designed to save space.
Small-projection toilets, such as those offered by the Tavistock Micra and RAK Compact collections,combine top quality function with a space-saving design. For even more available space, a wall-hung toilet can be a great option. By hiding the cistern, these toilets are attractive and compact.
There are also plenty of small basins available, including corner units.
Shower enclosures and shower baths
Small spaces are a particular challenge when it comes to the bathroom’s biggest feature: the bath. In some bathroom designs for small spaces, the solution is to skip a bath altogether. If you’re a shower person, don’t feel that you need to include a bath in every bathroom. A top quality shower enclosure can take up less room than a bath.
By having a shower-only design, you can still have luxury. Many shower enclosures offer a modern look, and there are options for any type of space. A bifold shower enclosure can be a great design choice for small bathrooms, with no extra space needed for the door to open.
If you aren’t ready to forego a bath entirely, shower baths can be a perfect compromise for small spaces. For rooms where a separate shower and bath aren’t possible, a shower bath can
give the best of both. They are great for families, too. A P-shaped shower bath can fit well into traditional bathroom designs, while an L-shaped unit fits perfectly with more modern
designs.
Bathroom storage
One of the challenges in any size bathroom is getting enough storage. Most bathroom designs for small spaces involve being creative with storage. With vanity units, cabinets, and other storage units,it’s possible to have pieces that serve multiple purposes.

Bathroom Designs for Small Spaces

September 21, 2012 in Bathroom Suites, Cloakroom Suites

Bathroom Designs for Small Spaces

Small on space but big on style

A small bathroom can be a design challenge. Trying to fit everything in can seem like a daunting task. However, with bathroom collections designed for small spaces and a bit of creativity, it’s possible to get a bathroom to have all the amenities without feeling cramped.

Small Designs

A great help in coming up with bathroom designs for small spaces is specially made bathroom units. While normal units can often work in small spaces, there are a number of bathroom suites designed to save space.
Small-projection toilets, such as those offered by the Tavistock Micra and RAK Compact collections, combine top quality function with a space-saving design. For even more available space, a wall-hung toilet can be a great option. By hiding the cistern, these toilets are attractive and compact.
There are also plenty of small basins available, including corner units.

Shower Enclosures and Shower Baths

Small spaces are a particular challenge when it comes to the bathroom’s biggest feature: the bath. In some bathroom designs for small spaces, the solution is to skip a bath altogether. If you’re a shower person, don’t feel that you need to include a bath in every bathroom. A top quality shower enclosure can take up less room than a bath.
By having a shower-only design, you can still have luxury. Many shower enclosures offer a modern look, and there are options for any type of space. A bifold shower enclosure can be a great design choice for small bathrooms, with no extra space needed for the door to open.
If you aren’t ready to forego a bath entirely, shower baths can be a perfect compromise for small spaces. For rooms where a separate shower and bath aren’t possible, a shower bath can give the best of both. They are great for families, too. A P-shaped shower bath can fit well into traditional bathroom designs, while an L-shaped unit fits perfectly with more modern designs.

Bathroom Storage

One of the challenges in any size bathroom is getting enough storage. Most bathroom designs for small spaces involve being creative with storage. With vanity units, cabinets, and other storage units, it’s possible to have pieces that serve multiple purposes.
A bathroom cabinet can be ideal for small spaces. Giving storage for small items, they can also function as the room’s mirror. They are great for tidying away all the things, like razors and toothbrushes, that can make a bathroom seem cluttered.
Vanity units and washstands can do the same for larger items. Units with integrated basins can make use of the space below. A vanity unit can hide things away, while a washstand can help give the impression of more space by being open.

Whatever your style, there are plenty of bathroom designs for small spaces. Even the tiniest cloakroom can seem spacious with the right choice of units, and it’s possible for a small family bathroom to have all the amenities.

Adding Cloakroom Suites To Smaller Spaces

March 6, 2012 in Bathroom Suites, Cloakroom Suites

Adding a cloakroom suite is sometimes not the first option that comes to mind when thinking of home upgrades, but it does have several advantages. This type of small washroom suite can be as simple as a remodeled closet or extra space underneath a staircase. Along with an added bathroom or other upgrade, this feature can increase the overall home value over a certain length of time. One of these spaces can also be a matter of convenience for visitors when it is located near the front section of the house.

When planning a cloakroom, home owners typically want to take the best possible advantage of the space available for the most reasonable cost. The cost of needed tools and materials can be a big factor for the final price. This kind of renovation project can be a DIY one for home owners with enough prior background experience in installing bathroom fixtures. Whether to hire a professional contractor is also a variable that affects the final cost of this kind of project.

This kind of added room usually differs from a full bathroom suite because it only contains a sink and toilet rather than a bathtub and shower. Products such as wall recessed toilet cisterns are designed to fit into even the smallest renovated closet space or newly-added room under the stairs. Many fixture sellers also have vanity furniture designed specially for these added washrooms. One of these fixtures can include a basin along with built-in counter space. Another option for maximizing the limited space is to install a corner-fitted toilet where space permits in this new washroom. Other toilets can also be wall-mounted to save on floor space as well. The type of installation option can depend on the total room dimensions along with the planned design.

A vanity unit with a sink basin is considered a standard installation for one of these washrooms. It typically does not require a large amount of storage space beyond a few shelves for hand towels and maybe a small cabinet for bathroom cleaning products. Combining one of these compact vanity units with a hidden cistern toilet is often one of the most economical options. This kind of fixture includes a cistern with a storage area at the top. These two units can usually be fitted close enough together to make the best use of the space yet still leave enough room for practical use.

Converting an existing closet or similar small room into a cloakroom suite can take some creativity and sometimes some specialized fixtures. Depending on the manufacturers and materials, some of these can be more expensive than others. The labor involved in the installation process can be another factor. Many home owners find that purchasing these types of vanity units and toilets together carries a lower price tag. With some planning, one of these smaller washrooms can be a welcome convenience for guests as well as a feature that may help bring a better sale price for a house in the future.

University Toilets For Sale, But Not How You Think

February 15, 2012 in Bathroom Suites, Cloakroom Suites, Uncategorized

In the current economic climate it’s often hard to make ends meet. This is true all of us, but also large bodies and even educational establishments. As student numbers dry up, governments cut budgets everywhere they can and donors are less likely to dig in their pockets. Faced with these challenges many colleges and universities are looking for new revenue streams. One that many universities and colleges in the USA have decided to try is naming rights for toilet stalls. Or, as our American cousins call them, bathrooms.

Rather than writing rude messages, puerile humour or vindictive messages about their exes on the toilet walls and doors, donors can pay to have their names immortalised on the smallest room. No doubt this is where some profound thoughts are formed amongst some great minds, but it does seem unconventional to immortalise your name on a toilet rather than on a statue or even a bench.

In the American state of Utah, a donation of $2,000 to the Dixie State College you can have your name emblazoned on a toilet stall. Initially this was for the toilets in a new building intended for a musical theatre troupe. Unfortunately uptake was unexpectedly slow and the building was not completed and the troupe is unfortunately out of business.

However, this isn’t an isolated effort. The prestigious Harvard Law School has opened the the Falik Men’s Room. The prestigious Boston, Massachusetts based Ivy League establishment is nothing like as reasonable as its Utah competition and William Falik donated some $100,000 to his old school in an effort to heighten public awareness of a fellowship named after his father. For a donation that size Steven Oliveira, Harvard Law’s dean for development and alumni relations, said that the organisation was happy to go along with the donor’s wishes. “We thought it was kind of tongue in-cheek and we were willing to do it,” said Oliveira.

Not all universities are quite so willing to accept donations for this kind of naming. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) was apparently approached by an ex student of their’s called Brad Feld about a decade ago looking to name some toilets in exchange for a donation. They refused.

Feld was not deterred, however, and managed to get a toilet named after him at the University of Colorado in their Boulder science building. John Bennett, Director of the university’s Alliance for Technology, Learning & Society, John Bennett, approached Feld and offered him the chance to sponsor a campus toilet for $25,000 after hearing that he had been rejected by MIT. Feld lives in Boulder and agreed immediately. Obviously he wasn’t deterred by the perceived status of the toilet when it comes to having his name on the building and the college could get a lot of cloakroom suites with that money.

Maximise Your Home With An Extra Wash Area

January 22, 2012 in Cloakroom Suites

One of the things that adds the most value to a home, both in terms of money and adding options and functionality to the people who live there, is an additional bathroom or washroom facilities. This may be in the form of an en suite, converting a box or storage room into a bathroom or even adding a cloakroom under the stairs. By adding an additional toilet and basin in another room you free up the bathroom for use just for the bath and shower and also means you can direct visitors to a room they don’t have to traipse through the entire home to get to.
When it comes to adding this additional washroom, you may find that you have to look to more innovative products in order to maximise the space available and actually get the functionality you need into a smaller area. Just because you can’t fit in a conventional bathroom suite it doesn’t mean that you have to give up all hope of adding an extra washroom and making your home more attractive and more useful.

When it comes to choosing the basin for the room, consider vanity units which may have a smaller basin as well as adding some much needed storage into a smaller space. If this isn’t an option or is not to your personal taste then there is also wall mounted basins which have a range of different shapes and sizes and means that you don’t need to have the room on the floor for the basin, just a space on the wall. This allows you to hang a basin on a wall where the floor may be partially obstructed. Some of these basins also come in a corner design, where they can fit within the corner of the room if there is no other space available.

Toilets, too, are products where innovations allow you to place them in a smaller or more awkwardly arranged area than you might think. There are toilets that can have hidden or wall recessed cisterns. This means that your toilet cistern can go in a piece of furniture with a useful storage area on the top, in a combined piece of furniture that sits alongside a vanity unit to provide storage, a basin and useful counter space or even hidden within a wall to make the fullest use of the room. Toilets also come in designs that allow them to fit within the corners of the room or even be wall mounted if there is something on the floor or lower part of the wall preventing them from reaching all the way down.
Typically, cloakroom suites contain some variation of basin and toilet. It could contain a vanity unit and toilet with hidden cistern, be one of the combined vanity unit and toilet pieces of furniture or be made of two hanging wall units. Buying both of them together like this saves money and ensures that the pieces match together in terms of design and colour.